Pure and Organic CBD & and Hemp Products

Effective medicine provided by mother nature

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Why CBD?

More and more renowned scientists worldwide publish their researches on the favorable impact of CBD on the human body. Not only does this natural compound deal with physical symptoms, but also it helps with emotional disorders. Distinctly positive results with no side effects make CBD products nothing but a phenomenal success.

This organic product helps cope with:

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Range of Products

We have created a range of products so you can pick the most convenient ones depending on your needs and likes.

CBD Capsules Morning/Day/Night:

CBD Capsules

These capsules increase the energy level as you fight stress and sleep disorder. Only 1-2 capsules every day with your supplements will help you address fatigue and anxiety and improve your overall state of health.

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CBD Tincture

CBD Tincture

No more muscle tension, joints inflammation and backache with this easy-to-use dropper. Combined with coconut oil, CBD Tincture purifies the body and relieves pain. And the bottle is of such a convenient size that you can always take it with you.

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Pure CBD Freeze

Pure CBD Freeze

Even the most excruciating pain can be dealt with the help of this effective natural CBD-freeze. Once applied on the skin, this product will localize the pain without ever getting into the bloodstream.

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Pure CBD Lotion

Pure CBD Lotion

This lotion offers you multiple advantages. First, it moisturizes the skin to make elastic. And second, it takes care of the inflammation and pain. Coconut oil and Shia butter is extremely beneficial for the health and beauty of your skin.

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High CBD Strain Seeds (+ Flower and Extracts)

Delayed-Release THC Capsules Robust

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13.01.2019

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  • THC Robust Delayed-Release Capsules CBD:THC psychoactive mg Cannabinoids per bottle Ingredients: Organic Sesame Oil, Candelilia wax, Pure . About Our Medical Cannabis CBD Delayed-Release Capsules THC Robust ratio is recommended by many oncologists for support with tumors and other. Order THC Robust Delayed-Release Capsules CBD/THC from The OG Collective delivered to you. Get the best Tinctures in 3 easy clicks.

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    Some practitioners worry that the DEA [U. Drug Enforcement Administration] might come after them," she added. In fact, it's important to work with a doctor because there's a "therapeutic window" with THC, the active component in marijuana that causes the high, according to Dr. Mark Wallace, a board member of the American Pain Society. If you get a dose that's within that window, the pain is relieved.

    If you get too little, you won't get pain relief, and if you go over the therapeutic window, pain is actually worsened, Wallace explained. The study included a question survey of nearly seniors who had used medical marijuana for chronic pain. The seniors had received their medical marijuana from dispensaries in New York or Minnesota. The average age of the seniors was 61 to 70, and 54 percent were female.

    Many 45 percent used a vaporized oil in an e-cigarette device. Twenty-eight percent used a medical marijuana pill. Twenty-one percent said they used medical marijuana daily, while 23 percent said they used it twice a day. Another 39 percent said they used it more than twice a day, the researchers noted.

    About half the time, medical marijuana had been recommended by a doctor. One-quarter of the seniors decided to try medical marijuana at the urging of a friend or family member. Almost all -- 91 percent -- would recommend medical marijuana to someone else.

    When asked how medical marijuana affected their pain levels, the seniors reported going from a 9 on a pain scale of zero to 10 down to 5. With medical marijuana, I'm taking more patients off opioids," he said. Medical cannabis is probably safer than a lot of drugs we give," Wallace said. Medical marijuana can also stimulate appetite, Martins-Welch said, which is a "godsend for cancer patients," though extra eating may not be a welcome side effect for everyone.

    Martins-Welch said it's best to discuss potential drug interactions with your doctor, but it's usually OK to mix marijuana and opioids. She said she'd caution against mixing medical marijuana with alcohol. The study findings were presented recently at the American Geriatrics Society meeting in Orlando, Fla.

    Studies presented at meetings are typically viewed as preliminary until they've been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Learn more about medical marijuana from the U. National Institute on Drug Abuse. If you have reached this screen, your current device or browser is unable to access the full Banner Health website. To see the full site, please upgrade your browser to the most recent version of Safari, Chrome, Firefox or Internet Explorer.

    It is proposed that a licence for micro-cultivation would authorize the same activities as a licence for standard cultivation, but at a smaller scale. It is proposed that the regulations would set out a threshold to define a micro-cultivator. Health Canada is considering a number of options for this threshold, such as plant count, size of growing area, total production, or gross revenue.

    Part of the purpose of this consultation is to solicit feedback from interested parties regarding the most appropriate basis for establishing this threshold, and what the threshold should be. A micro-cultivation licence would authorize the cultivation of cannabis plants and to produce cannabis seeds, cannabis plants, fresh cannabis and dried cannabis.

    A licence for micro-cultivation would also authorize associated or supplemental activities related to these core activities, including possession, transportation, research and development, storage and destruction. The intra-industry sale of seeds, plants, and harvested materials for example, fresh and dried cannabis to other cultivators, processors, and holders of a research authorization would also be allowed. However, micro-cultivators would not be able to sell directly to the public or to federally-licensed or provincially- or territorially-authorized sellers.

    As described further in section 2. The intent of this licence category is to enable a legal source of starting materials both for commercial and personal cultivation , and the development of new varieties of high quality cannabis. It is proposed that a licence for a nursery would authorize the cultivation of any variety of cannabis plants including industrial hemp , and to produce seeds and seedlings including clones.

    A nursery licence would also authorize related activities, including possession, transportation, research and development, storage, and destruction. Nurseries would be permitted to sell live plants and seeds to other licensed cultivators, licensed processors, and holders of a research authorization.

    However, they would not be able to sell directly to the public or to federally-licensed or provincially- or territorially-authorized sellers. The harvest of other plant material and production of any other class of cannabis would be prohibited under this class of licence.

    This material would need to be destroyed. It is proposed that a licence for industrial hemp would authorize the cultivation of industrial hemp plants and the production and sale of seeds and grains and their derivatives.

    As such, activities related to these plant parts such as their processing or sale would not require a licence under the proposed Act. Further, as is currently the case under the Industrial Hemp Regulations, a licence would not be required for the sale of derivatives of seed and grain that contain 10 micrograms per gram of THC or less.

    An industrial hemp licence would also authorize related activities, including possession, transportation, research and development, consistent with other classes of licences. To improve upon the current regulatory requirements for industrial hemp producers, it is proposed that industrial hemp licences would authorize the intra-industry sale of leaves, flowers and branches or the whole plant. As is currently the case under the Industrial Hemp Regulations, industrial hemp licences would authorize the cultivation of approved industrial hemp varieties from pedigreed seeds.

    Since the THC content of plants produced from these seeds is consistently 0. It is proposed that a licence for standard processing would authorize the production and packaging and labelling of a range of cannabis products destined for sale to the public. Further information on the types of cannabis products that licensed processors would be able to produce is discussed in Part 5 of this consultation paper. A licence for standard processing would also authorize related activities, including possession, transportation, research and development, storage, destruction, and the intra-industry sale of cannabis to other federal licence holders or provincially- or territorially-authorized sellers.

    A separate authorization would be required for sales directly to the public see sections 2. The intent of this licence category is to enable the participation of small-scale processors in the legal cannabis industry.

    It is proposed that a licence for micro-processing would authorize the same activities as a licence for standard processing, but at a smaller scale. It is proposed that the regulations would set out a threshold to define a micro-processor. Health Canada is considering a number of options for this threshold, such as limiting allowed activities to processing harvested product from a maximum number of micro-cultivators and nurseries, total production, on-site inventory, or gross revenue.

    As with a licence for standard processing, a licence for micro-processing would authorize related activities, including possession, transportation, research and development, storage, destruction, and the intra-industry sale of products to other federal licence holders or to provincially- or territorially-authorized sellers.

    A licence for the sale of cannabis for medical purposes would authorize the sale of cannabis products obtained from a federally-licensed processor to registered clients or to an individual who is responsible for a registered client in a manner consistent with the current system established under the ACMPR ordered over the phone, online or via written order, with secure delivery through the mail or by courier.

    As with other licences, a licence for sale for medical purposes would authorize related activities, such as possession, transportation, research and development, storage, destruction, and the intra-industry sale of cannabis to other federal licence holders. Under the proposed Cannabis Act, provinces and territories could licence and oversee the distribution and sale to adult consumers of cannabis for non-medical purposes.

    In the event that a province or territory has not established a retail environment with appropriate safeguards to enable the purchase of legal, regulated cannabis by July , it is proposed that the regulations would enable the Minister to licence, potentially on a temporary basis, the sale of cannabis for non-medical purposes to adult consumers.

    This class of licence would authorize the sale of cannabis products obtained from a licensed processor to adult consumers in Canada ordered over the phone, online or via written order, with secure delivery through the mail or by courier. As with other licences, a licence for sale for non-medical purposes would authorize related activities, such as possession, transportation, research and development, storage, destruction, and the intra-industry sale of cannabis to other federal licence holders.

    As set out further in section 2. Cannabis must be tested for microbial and chemical contaminants, residues of solvents, content of THC and CBD, and disintegration of capsules, using validated methods. In addition, on May 5, , Health Canada announced that it would require all licensed producers to conduct mandatory testing of all cannabis products destined for sale for the presence of unauthorized pesticides for more information, please see the Statement from Health Canada on Mandatory Testing of Medical Cannabis for Unauthorized Pesticides.

    Non-viable seeds must be tested by a laboratory accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. As described in further detail in section 2. For industrial hemp, it is proposed that mandatory testing only be required as set out in section 2. Licensed processors could conduct their own, in-house analytical testing, however they would be required to demonstrate that they were using validated testing methodologies. Health Canada would require mandatory testing for the presence of unauthorized pesticides to be conducted by an independent third-party laboratory.

    In general, all independent third-party laboratories conducting analytical testing of cannabis, including testing of microbial and chemical contaminants, residues of solvents, content of THC and CBD, disintegration of capsules, and testing for the presence of unauthorized pesticides, would be required to hold an analytical testing licence under the Cannabis Act. Such laboratories would also be required to demonstrate that they were using validated testing methodologies.

    With respect to industrial hemp, an analytical testing licence would not be required for private laboratories accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency that conduct seed viability testing. As with other licence types, a licence for analytical testing would authorize activities with cannabis such as possession, transportation, storage and destruction. A licence for analytical testing would also authorize research and development related to the analytical testing of cannabis in particular the development and validation of testing methodologies , including industrial hemp.

    Licensed analytical testing laboratories would be required to destroy any cannabis or industrial hemp sent for analytical testing within 90 days of being tested.

    As is currently the case, the import or export of cannabis would require a permit from the Minister of Health. As set out in the proposed Act, import or export permits would only be available for medical or scientific purposes, or in respect of industrial hemp.

    It is proposed that a research authorization would enable activities with cannabis for the purpose of research by persons who do not hold any other type of licence issued under the Cannabis Act and whose activities would otherwise be prohibited under the Act for example, they are involved in the possession of 30 grams of dried cannabis or its equivalent in public or distribution of more than 30 grams of dried cannabis or its equivalent, or possession by an organization.

    These activities would include possessing, cultivating, processing, storing, administering, and transporting cannabis. Authorized activities would not include the sale of cannabis - however, there would be provisions to enable the commercialization of novel research and development for example, the sale of new plant genetics.

    However, exceptions to this requirement could be sought by those wishing to commercialize novel products of research and development for example, new plant genetics or for archival purposes for example, a seed bank. As described above, persons holding a federal licence to conduct activities with cannabis, such as cultivation or processing, would be authorized to conduct research and development under their existing licence, provided that the research is related to the core activities authorized under the licence.

    For example, an industrial hemp licence would authorize research with industrial hemp, but the holder of an industrial hemp licence would be required to seek a separate authorization to conduct research with other varieties of cannabis.

    It should be noted that persons seeking to conduct clinical trials with cannabis would still be required to seek appropriate authorization under the FDA and its regulations. It is proposed that the regulations set out specific requirements by class of licence. As discussed in section 1. For each class of licence, it is proposed that the regulations would set, among others, requirements related to:.

    It is proposed that the regulations would require notice be provided to local government, fire and policing authorities for all licence classes except industrial hemp, analytical testing, or for sale licences where cannabis is not stored on-site.

    It is proposed that the regulations provide that all licences issued under the Cannabis Act be valid for a period of no more than five years. It is proposed that the regulations would prohibit the conduct of any licensed activity in a dwelling-house. It is proposed that the regulations would permit both outdoor and indoor cultivation of cannabis under all four classes of cultivation licence: For any indoor areas where cannabis is present such as where it is cultivated or where it is dried or stored , it is proposed that the regulations would require reasonable measures to prevent the escape of odours and pollen.

    It is proposed that these restrictions would apply to all licences, except industrial hemp, analytical testing, and sale licences. Under all licence classes, cannabis with the exception of cannabis plants and industrial hemp would need to be stored and processed indoors. Physical security requirements set out in the regulations would comprise one aspect of the overall approach to preventing legally produced cannabis from being diverted to an illegal market or activity, or from illegal cannabis being a source of supply for the legal industry.

    Other aspects would include personnel security requirements, record keeping and reporting, participation in the national cannabis tracking system, and facilities being subject to inspections.

    Physical security requirements would be designed primarily to mitigate against the risk of cannabis being removed or stolen from a licensed site or during transit and diverted to an illegal market or activity. As a result, it is proposed that licences that authorize activities resulting in large quantities of high-value cannabis products being present on site would face proportionately higher physical security requirements compared to other licence classes.

    It is further proposed that the regulations would require all licence holders to take measures to safeguard cannabis in transit, including when transporting or shipping cannabis to another licence holder or when shipping cannabis to a provincially- or territorially-authorized seller.

    For standard cultivation and standard processing licences, as well as for federal sale licences where cannabis is stored on-site for medical purposes or non-medical purposes , it is proposed that the regulations require the following physical security requirements around the perimeter of the site:. In addition, for these same licence classes, it is proposed that the regulations require the following security measures for indoor areas where cannabis is present excluding growing areas:. These physical security requirements are similar to those in place under the ACMPR, with four notable proposed changes.

    First, the proposed regulations would no longer require cannabis to be stored in accordance with the Directive on Physical Security Requirements for Controlled Substances Security Requirements for Licensed Dealers for the Storage of Controlled Substances. Second, the proposed regulations would require visual recordings to be kept for one year, rather than for two years. Based on experience with the current program, this period of time is considered to be sufficient for compliance and enforcement purposes.

    Third, the proposed regulations would not require visual monitoring of areas where cannabis is grown. Considering the lower risk of theft of whole plants compared to processed material, other physical security requirements respecting cultivation areas such as visual monitoring of the perimeter and points of entry are considered to be sufficient mitigation against the risk of theft.

    Finally, the proposed regulations would no longer require the presence of a security-cleared individual, as will be discussed further in section 2. For micro-cultivation, nursery licences, and micro-processing licences, it is proposed that the regulations would require the following:.

    For industrial hemp licences, it is proposed that the regulations not prescribe specific physical security requirements. As a result, the proposed regulations would remove the current requirement under the IHR, which requires that industrial hemp be stored in a locked container or locked location, or on premises to which only authorized persons have access. This approach would allow industrial hemp to be stored under the same conditions as other agricultural products.

    For federal sale licences where cannabis is not stored on-site, it is proposed that the regulations would not prescribe specific physical security requirements. This proposed approach would be a change from the existing framework, and licensees conducting analytical testing of cannabis would no longer be required to adhere to the physical security requirements set out in the Directive on Physical Security Requirements for Controlled Substances Security Requirements for Licensed Dealers for the Storage of Controlled Substances.

    Personnel security requirements set out in the regulations would comprise a second element of the overall approach to preventing legally produced cannabis from being diverted to an illegal market or activity.

    Personnel security requirements would be designed primarily to mitigate against the risk that individuals associated with organized crime infiltrate licensed organizations and use their position to benefit, financially or otherwise, criminal organizations.

    Under the proposed Act, the Minister of Health would have the authority to grant or refuse to grant a security clearance, or suspend or cancel a security clearance, with respect to individuals associated with a licence applicant or a licence holder.

    The proposed process for issuing security clearances is set out in section 3 of this consultation paper. This section sets out general requirements with respect to personnel security, and identifies specific persons associated with a licence that would be required to hold a valid security clearance issued by the Minister of Health.

    It is proposed that the regulations would establish the following personnel security requirements for standard cultivation, micro-cultivation, nursery, standard processing, micro-processing, and federal sale for both medical and non-medical purposes licences, and in some instances for research authorizations.

    These requirements would not apply to industrial hemp or analytical testing licences. The proposed personnel security requirements represent a change from similar requirements currently in place under the ACMPR in two key respects. The proposed regulations would remove these requirements and instead require at least one individual holding a security clearance to be on site during normal business operations. Second, the proposed regulations would add new requirements for key positions to hold a valid security clearance - such as the quality assurance person, or the master grower.

    As well, the proposed regulations would require individuals in positions to direct or control the licensed organization - such as the directors and officers of a parent company or major shareholders - to also hold a valid security clearance. For industrial hemp and analytical testing, it is proposed that the regulations not prescribe requirements for individuals to hold security clearances from the Minister.

    Regulatory requirements with respect to good production practices would be the primary means by which the government would control the quality of cannabis through the legal supply chain. It is proposed that the regulations establish good production practice requirements for all classes of cultivation licences standard, micro, nursery and industrial hemp as well as for all classes of processing licences.

    It is proposed that the other classes of licences analytical testing and sale licences would not be subject to good production practice requirements, with the exception of those relating to recall and adverse reaction reporting. It is proposed that the regulations made under the proposed Cannabis Act establish requirements for good production practices based on those found in the ACMPR for standard cultivation, micro-cultivation, nursery and processing licences. Specific good production practices would only apply to a licence holder to the extent that they are applicable to the activities authorized under the licence.

    In general, the proposed regulations would establish the following requirements:. For industrial hemp licences, it is proposed that the regulations require licence holders to implement the same good production practices required under the IHR and applicable provisions of the exemption issued pursuant to section 56 of the CDSA.

    These requirements would include, for example, that hemp producers be required to clean equipment to avoid the inadvertent dissemination of industrial hemp. As with the current circumstance, THC testing for most crops would not be required, while THC testing at the plant breeding and seed production levels would continue. Finally, it is proposed that the regulations not reference the Industrial Hemp Technical Manual, in favour of guidance that is aligned between requirements for hemp and other varieties of cannabis regulated under the proposed Cannabis Act.

    For parts of the hemp plant transferred to a licensed processor for further processing for example, into cannabis oil or for packaging and labelling for sale to consumers, the applicable good production practices set out above for all cannabis products would apply. Record keeping and reporting requirements set out in the regulations would help enable licensed persons to quickly and efficiently demonstrate that they are in compliance with their legal obligations under the proposed Act and its regulations.

    As well, record keeping and reporting requirements would help the Minister of Health protect public health - through measures such as the requirement to report details of product recalls or serious adverse reactions to specific cannabis products. Finally, record keeping and reporting requirements would enable the Minister of Health to monitor the evolution of the cannabis industry and track developments - such as the development of new types of products - to ensure that the regulatory framework is working effectively to support the objectives of the proposed Act.

    To these ends, it is proposed that the regulations set out specific record keeping and reporting obligations for each class of licence. Reporting requirements with respect to the tracking of cannabis and cannabis products, including information such as production levels, inventory amounts, and sales volumes would be captured under the Cannabis Tracking System that would be established under Part 6 of the proposed Act, and are covered separately in section 4 of this consultation paper.

    In general, it is proposed that the regulations require the following records be maintained by licensed persons, along with setting out the manner in which they must be maintained, and their retention period:. It is proposed that the regulations would provide the Minister of Health with the authority to specify the regular reporting of any of these records, including the form, manner and frequency of such reports. For example, this would include reporting by persons authorized to sell cannabis on voluntary recalls of cannabis products, including information such as:.

    With respect to recalls, it is proposed that the regulations would require authorized sellers to report at three junctures: For sales licences, it is proposed that the regulations specify additional record keeping and reporting requirements. For licences for sales for medical purposes, it is proposed that licensees would be subject to requirements consistent with current requirements set out under the ACMPR, including details on:.

    For licences for sale for non-medical purposes, it is proposed that licensees would be subject to the following additional record keeping and reporting requirements:.

    Consistent with the current requirements under the IHR, industrial hemp licence holders would be required to keep records, samples or other documents proving that the seeds used are of pedigreed status, among other record keeping requirements. Return to footnote 1 referrer. Under the proposed Cannabis Act, the Minister of Health has the authority to issue import and export permits for medical or scientific purposes, or in respect of industrial hemp.

    With respect to the import and export of cannabis for medical or scientific purposes, it is proposed that the regulations set out similar requirements to those found in the ACMPR and the Narcotic Control Regulations. This will enable persons licensed or permitted to conduct activities with cannabis to receive or send cannabis across international boundaries.

    Permits would be issued on a case-by-case basis and the validity period of a permit would be for a maximum of six months. With respect to the import and export of industrial hemp, it is proposed that the regulations set out the same requirements as currently in place under the IHR, with the following modifications:. More research and development into cannabis will be critical in ensuring that public health and safety aspects are better understood and addressed.

    As well, the new cannabis industry will need to have the ability to develop and test new strains of cannabis, new product forms and new production methods to ensure they can compete with the illegal market.

    Finally, in its report, the Task Force emphasized the need for more research aimed at understanding, validating and approving cannabis-based medicines, and on the possible health benefits and harms of cannabis use. Consistent with the overall principles of establishing regulatory requirements based on risk, it is proposed that the regulations establish a streamlined framework applying to activities with cannabis for the purpose of research, with security requirements based on the type of research being undertaken.

    It is proposed that any person in Canada would be eligible to apply for an authorization to conduct research. This would include academic researchers, licence holders and industry. Based on the details of the research being undertaken, a research authorization could authorize any activity in relation to cannabis including its possession, cultivation, processing, storage, administration, transportation, etc.

    However, there would be provisions to enable the commercialization of novel research and development for example, the sale of new plant genetics. Physical security requirements would be tailored to the level of risk of diversion associated with the specific research being conducted, consistent with requirements for the various classes of licences set out in part 2. For research involving the cultivation of cannabis, researchers would be subject to the same physical security requirements as with a cultivation licence standard, micro or nursery , depending on the number of mature plants used in the research.

    For research activities involving the processing or manufacturing of cannabis products for example, dried cannabis or cannabis oil , the physical security requirements applicable to an analytical testing licence would be required.

    As well, it is proposed that the regulations provide the Minister with the authority to require individuals involved in the research to hold a valid security clearance, depending on the type of research being undertaken and the quantity and form of cannabis involved.

    In addition, holders of research authorizations would be required to adhere to any reporting requirements specified by the Minister in issuing an authorization consistent with the requirements respecting the record keeping and reporting of research and development activities undertaken by licensed organizations described in section 2.

    These requirements may include reporting into the Cannabis Tracking System discussed in section 4 of this consultation paper if the research activities involve high volumes of cannabis.

    The proposed Cannabis Act provides the Minister of Health with the authority to specify how applications must be submitted and what information must be provided in an application including, financial information. It is proposed that the Minister would specify these requirements in an administrative document such as an application guide, published on Health Canada's website.

    The proposed Cannabis Act sets out the grounds upon which the Minister of Health may refuse to issue a licence or permit. These include, for example, that the applicant is under the age of 18, is not ordinarily resident in Canada, or that a security clearance in respect of the application has been refused or cancelled. In addition, the proposed Act specifies grounds under which the Minister may suspend or revoke a licence or permit. The Governor in Council has the authority to specify additional grounds for refusal or revocation in regulations.

    It is proposed that the regulations add that the Minister may refuse to issue a licence, or revoke a licence, in the event that the applicant or licence holder fails to obtain or maintain other required federal licences or authorizations. It is proposed that select personnel associated with certain licences issued under the proposed Cannabis Act hold a valid security clearance issued by the Minister of Health.

    The regulations would enable the Minister to refuse to grant security clearances to individuals with associations to organized crime; or with past convictions for, or an association with, drug trafficking, corruption or violent offences. This is the approach in place today under existing regulations governing the licensed production of cannabis for medical purposes; this approach was designed to protect the integrity of the legal production system.

    Health Canada acknowledges that there are individuals who have histories of non-violent, lower-risk criminal activity for example, simple possession of cannabis, or small-scale cultivation of cannabis plants who may seek to obtain a security clearance so they can participate in the legal cannabis industry.

    Part of the purpose of this consultation is to solicit feedback from interested parties on whether these individuals should be permitted to participate in the legal cannabis industry.

    As discussed in section 2. The main purpose of these requirements is to mitigate against the risks that individuals associated with organized crime could infiltrate licensed organizations and use their position to conduct illegal activities with cannabis to the benefit of criminal organizations. This section of the consultation paper sets out the proposed approach that the Minister of Health would follow for the issuance of security clearances under the Cannabis Act regulations.

    It is proposed that the regulations provide that the Minister of Health may issue security clearances to individuals who do not pose an unacceptable risk to the integrity of the control of the production and distribution of cannabis under the proposed Act and its regulations. The regulations would specifically enable the Minister to refuse to grant clearances to individuals associated with organized crime.

    The Minister would also have the ability to refuse to grant clearances to individuals with past convictions for, or an association with, drug trafficking particularly trafficking to young persons ; corruption for example, money laundering or fraud ; or violent offences which may, among other risks, indicate a risk to the safety of Health Canada inspectors. Each application for a security clearance would be assessed on its own merits.

    Taken together, this proposed approach is consistent with the approach currently in place for the licensed production of cannabis for medical purposes under the ACMPR, which is designed to protect the integrity of the legal production system. Health Canada acknowledges that there are individuals who have histories of non-violent, lower-risk criminal activity for example, simple possession of cannabis, or small-scale cultivation of cannabis plants who will seek to obtain a security clearance so they can participate in the legal cannabis industry.

    It is proposed that the regulations would require the Minister of Health to conduct the following checks prior to making a determination whether to issue or refuse a security clearance:.

    As well, it is proposed that the regulations authorize the Minister to conduct these checks at any point after a security clearance has been issued during the period in which it is valid for the purpose of determining whether or not to suspend or cancel the clearance.

    When granting a security clearance, it is proposed that the regulations would authorize the Minister to set a validity period and expiration date for the clearance. This would be based on the level of risk posed by the applicant, taking into consideration the information described in section 3.

    In all cases, it is proposed that the regulations would require that the expiry date be no more than five years after the day on which the clearance was granted. If a security clearance is initially granted for less than five years, it is proposed that the Minister would have the ability to extend the validity period of the clearance to a total of five years.

    Currently under the ACMPR, a licensee must notify the Minister if an individual holder of a security clearance no longer requires the clearance as part of his or her duties and responsibilities within the organization for example, the individual leaves the organization to accept employment with another licensee. In these circumstances, the security clearance in respect of the individual would be cancelled.

    The current requirement to cancel the security clearance is regarded as creating a barrier to the movement of employees within the industry and creates unnecessary administrative burden associated with the re-clearance of these individuals.

    As a result, it is proposed that the regulations would provide for individuals to maintain a valid security clearance when transferring employment between licensees. Licence holders would still be required to notify the Minister when there is a change in the individual occupying any key position that requires a valid security clearance see section 2. It is proposed that, in the event that the Minister decides to refuse an application for a security clearance, the regulations require the Minister to notify the applicant in writing.

    The notice would set out the basis for the Minister's decision, and the applicant would be provided with a reasonable period of time to make written representations in response to the refusal notice. It is proposed that the regulations would provide the Minister with the authority to suspend a security clearance upon receipt of information that the individual may represent an unacceptable risk to the integrity of the system, including information related to charges under federal statues such as the Criminal Code, as will be described further in section 3.

    In such an instance, the Minister would be required to provide notice to the holder of the security clearance, including the basis for the suspension, and provide the holder of the security clearance with a reasonable period of time to make written representations before making a decision to reinstate the security clearance or cancel it.

    It is proposed that the regulations would provide the Minister with the authority to cancel a security clearance at any point where the Minister is of the opinion that the holder of the clearance poses an unacceptable risk to the integrity of the control of the production and distribution of cannabis under the proposed Act and its regulations, including the risk of cannabis being diverted to an illegal market or activity.

    In such a circumstance, the Minister would be required to notify the holder of the security clearance and inform the holder of the security clearance of the basis of the cancellation. The regulations would require that the Minister provide the clearance holder with a reasonable period of time to make written representations in response to the notice before the cancellation of the security clearance.

    In the event that a security clearance is suspended or cancelled affecting a key position, or that the incumbent of a key position leaves the organization, it is proposed that the regulations would provide a reasonable period of time for an alternate individual to be identified and granted a security clearance. It is proposed that the regulations limit those individuals who are eligible to apply for a security clearance to only those individuals who are required to hold a security clearance as described in section 2.

    The regulations would provide that an individual would not be eligible to apply for a security clearance if, in the preceding five years, the individual had been refused a security clearance or had their security clearance cancelled. It is also proposed that the holder of a valid security clearance be required to notify the Minister of Health if they are charged with any offence under the Criminal Code, the proposed Cannabis Act, the CDSA or the Food and Drugs Act.

    Based on this new information, the Minister of Health could suspend the security clearance as set out in section 3. It is proposed that the Minister would specify the information that an individual would be required to submit in an application for a security clearance in an administrative document such as an application guide, published on Health Canada's website.

    In general, it is proposed that the information required be consistent with the current requirements set out in the ACMPR. In addition, it is proposed an applicant would be required to provide information about any previous criminal charges, including those that did not result in a conviction. The purpose of this system would be to track cannabis throughout the supply chain to help prevent diversion of cannabis into, and out of, the legal market.

    A ministerial order would set out who would be required to report into the system, as well as the information that would need to be reported. It is proposed that any person authorized to conduct activities with cannabis whether federally or at the provincial or territorial level would be required to report into the Cannabis Tracking System.

    Part 6 of the proposed Cannabis Act authorizes the Minister of Health to establish and maintain a national Cannabis Tracking System CTS to enable the tracking of cannabis throughout the supply chain. Combined with the physical and personnel security requirements for licensees set out in section 2. In order to establish and maintain the CTS, the proposed Act would provide the Minister of Health with the authority to make a ministerial order that would require certain persons named in the order to report specific information about their authorized activities with cannabis, in the form and manner specified by the Minister.

    In this context, the ministerial order would be similar to a regulation made by the Governor in Council, in that it would establish legal obligations that would need to be respected. The Minister of Health could not require the reporting of any personal information about consumers who purchase cannabis at the retail level. The CTS would enable a single reporting platform to track the movement of cannabis throughout the supply chain that could be used by various government authorities to verify compliance or prevent non-compliance with other federal, provincial, or territorial laws respecting cannabis.

    It is proposed that the ministerial order would require any class of person authorized to conduct activities with cannabis, either through the proposed Cannabis Act or through provincial or territorial legislation, to report the information described in section 4. It is proposed that the ministerial order would require the reporting of all transactions involving all cannabis with the exception of industrial hemp as defined in section 2.

    Monthly tracking has been in place for current licensed producers since October This reporting mechanism provides Health Canada with data regarding cultivation and production, volumes of inventories and sales, number of shipments, and amount destroyed. This monthly tracking process represents the basis for what the ministerial order may require in terms of reporting.

    Health Canada will explore how the current monthly reporting requirements can be expanded to capture data at various points in the overall supply chain. For industrial hemp, it is proposed that licence holders would only need to report transactions involving the transfer of leaves, flowers and branches to another licence holder and they would not need to report the destruction of this material in the CTS should they choose not to sell it.

    It is proposed that the CTS would be a data collection tool that would show, across the supply chain, both inventory and production levels, as well as high-level movements of cannabis for example, from cultivator to processor, from processor to a provincial distributor, or from within the province or territory to retailer, etc.

    Information would need to be reported on a monthly basis, with the exception of losses and thefts, which would be required to be reported within 10 days of detection. The proposed Cannabis Act would provide the Minister of Health with the authority to share information in the CTS with other government authorities under certain circumstances. These include, for example, disclosing information to a provincial or territorial government for the purpose of enforcing a provincial or territorial law authorizing the wholesale distribution or retail sale of cannabis.

    The proposed Cannabis Act would provide the Governor in Council with the authority to specify additional circumstances under which the Minister of Health may disclose information in the CTS. It is proposed that the regulations specify that the Minister may disclose information to a provincial or territorial government for the purpose of administering cannabis-related public health programs or activities.

    The reporting process would include an online portal that would be accessible to federally-, provincially-, and territorially-regulated parties and would allow these parties to report their data online.

    The data would then be captured in a case management system, where Health Canada could verify, and analyze, as required, the data received.

    It is proposed that the regulations would establish rules and standards for the production of cannabis products, and would seek to:. The initial regulations would permit the sale to the public of dried cannabis, cannabis oil, fresh cannabis, cannabis plants, and cannabis seeds. The sale of edibles and concentrates to the public would be enabled within one year following the coming into force of the proposed Act.

    Schedule 4 of the proposed Cannabis Act sets out the classes of cannabis that may be sold to the public. The sale of any class of cannabis not included in Schedule 4 would be prohibited. With a view to reducing their appeal to youth, the proposed Act would prohibit the sale of cannabis that has an appearance, shape or other sensory attribute for which there are reasonable grounds to believe could be appealing to youth.

    The Government recognizes that cannabis products of all types are currently available in Canada through the illegal market. Cannabis products supplied through these means are unregulated and untested and may therefore pose a health risk if consumed, with no measures for recalls or product tracking.

    Part of the Government's strategy to displace the illegal market is to enable a legal industry that offers consumers a range of legal cannabis products that meet strict regulatory standards. The proposed Cannabis Act would permit the sale of the following five classes of cannabis at the outset: The proposed Act would provide the Minister with the ability to develop regulations to amend Schedule 4 to add other classes of cannabis.

    Edibles and concentrates would automatically be added to Schedule 4 one year following the coming into force of the Act, which would provide time for the Government to develop and consult on appropriate regulatory controls.

    It is proposed that fresh cannabis would be defined as freshly harvested parts of the cannabis plant that have not been subjected to a drying process, excluding seeds or other plant material that can be used to propagate cannabis. This class would include edible products, such as foods or beverages that contain cannabis.

    A precise definition would be set out in a subsequent regulatory proposal. This class would include products such as hashish, wax, shatter and vaping solutions. Under the ACMPR, only cannabis oil is permitted to be sold in certain dosage forms for example, capsules ; dosage forms for dried and fresh cannabis are not permitted. Under the new regulatory framework, it is proposed that a range of product forms be enabled for dried and fresh cannabis, to help the legal industry displace the illegal market.

    Additional product forms could include, for example, pre-rolled cannabis and vaporization cartridges manufactured with dried cannabis. Product forms for cannabis oil, such as cannabis oil capsules, oral sprays, and cannabis oil intended for topical application, would continue to be permitted. It is proposed that regulatory requirements respecting the maximum THC content per unit be based on how the product is represented to be consumed.

    For dried cannabis products intended for inhalation, whether by smoking or by vaporization, single use product forms such as pre-rolled cannabis would not be able to contain more than one gram of dried cannabis. Based on experience in U. For example, no more than 10 milligrams of THC per capsule or no more than 10 milligrams of THC delivered per dose of a metered product, such as a spray, would be permitted.

    As mentioned above, cannabis oil would be subject to a 30 milligrams per millilitre limit on THC concentration. Cannabis oil products intended for topical application would be subject to the same THC concentration limit and the label would need to clearly indicate that the product was not intended to be ingested.

    The proposed Cannabis Act would prohibit the sale of any mixture of substances that contain cannabis and any prohibited substance listed in Schedule 5 of the Act. Currently, the prohibited substances listed in Schedule 5 are nicotine, caffeine and ethyl alcohol.

    The Minister of Health would have, by order, the authority to amend Schedule 5 for example, to specify additional prohibited substances or to provide exemptions to permit the use of these substances in certain classes of cannabis. It is not proposed that Schedule 5 of the Act be amended at this time. In addition to Schedule 5 of the Act, the Governor in Council would have the authority to make regulations respecting the composition of cannabis or any class of cannabis.

    It is proposed that processors would not be permitted to manufacture products containing more than one class of cannabis in a single product. For fresh and dried cannabis, it is proposed that additives would be prohibited, meaning that additional ingredients such as fillers, flavourings or colourants could not be added to a product in either of these two classes. For cannabis oil, it is proposed that no additives aside from the carrier oil and those that are necessary to preserve quality or stability of the product would be permitted, meaning that no flavouring agents would be permitted other than those naturally-occurring in the carrier oil.

    All additives used would be required to be suitable for their intended use for example, suitable for ingestion or topical use , and would need to conform to the appropriate grade, such as pharmaceutical or food grade.

    If a cannabis oil product is intended for topical use, it could not contain known skin irritants or sensitizers. Additionally, no substance in the oil aside from cannabis could act to inhibit or enhance the effects of the natural cannabinoids. It is proposed that the regulations would set out requirements pertaining to the packaging and labelling of cannabis products. The proposed packaging and labelling requirements would promote informed consumer choice and allow for the safe handling and transportation of cannabis.

    All cannabis products would need to be packaged in a manner that is tamper-evident and child-resistant. Health Canada is proposing strict limits on the use of colours, graphics, and other special characteristics of packaging to curtail the appeal of products to youth. To ensure that consumers make informed decisions and to avoid misuse, products would be required to be labelled with specific information about the product, contain mandatory health warnings similar to tobacco products, and be marked with a clearly recognizable standardized cannabis symbol.

    Part 1 of the proposed Cannabis Act includes general prohibitions on the promotion, packaging and labelling, and the display of cannabis and cannabis accessories. The proposed Cannabis Act prohibits the sale of cannabis and cannabis accessories that, among other things, are packaged and labelled in a manner that is appealing to youth or includes elements intended to encourage consumption, such as lifestyle branding elements or testimonials.

    The proposed Act would provide the Governor in Council with the authority to make regulations respecting the packaging and labelling of cannabis and cannabis accessories, including the information that must appear on packages and labels. It is proposed that the regulations set out comprehensive packaging and labelling requirements that licensed processors would need to follow for classes of cannabis that are authorized for sale dried cannabis, fresh cannabis, cannabis oil, plants and seeds.

    These requirements would not apply to industrial hemp, which would be subject to packaging and labelling requirements similar to those in place under the Industrial Hemp Regulations. Additional packaging and labelling requirements for products also regulated under the Food and Drugs Act are described in section 8 of this consultation paper. All cannabis products would need to be packaged in a manner that is tamper-evident, child-resistant, prevents contamination, and keeps cannabis dry, consistent with the requirements in the ACMPR.

    In addition, it is proposed that the regulations would enable both inner and outer packaging in order to accommodate new product forms, and require packaging to be opaque. The maximum amount of cannabis in a single package would be 30 grams of dried cannabis, or the equivalent amount for other classes of cannabis, as outlined in Schedule 3 of the proposed Cannabis Act. For example, for cannabis oil, the maximum amount would be 2.

    These proposed maximum package amounts would be consistent with the amount of cannabis that the adults would be able to possess in public places upon coming into force of the proposed Cannabis Act. It is proposed that general labelling requirements would be the same for all cannabis products, regardless of whether the cannabis is sold for medical or non-medical purposes.

    However, additional client-specific information would be required to be affixed to the label of cannabis products intended for medical purposes, consistent with the current requirements set out in the ACMPR.

    Client-specific labels can be used to demonstrate to law enforcement that an individual is authorized to possess amounts that might be in excess of what is permitted under the proposed Act for example, 30 grams of dried or equivalent in public. Licensed processors would be required to label the package in which the cannabis product is contained, and do so in both official languages. It is proposed that the regulations would set out the following general labelling requirements:.

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    Comments

    vkontakte13

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    hahagomer

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